Tishta the Crystal Orb: Part Three Edit Completed

Oh my goodness. That was a slog. It took me three weeks to get through Part 3: Travels and Battles, of “Tishta the Crystal Orb.” Granted, it is a much longer section than Part 2: Learning to Trust, but, still, three weeks versus three days? I had a lot going on. At least, in the beginning, the drugs I was taking for the stomach pain last month made me stupid—literally, I couldn’t focus on anything. Regardless of that, I made progress only in fits and starts. I am so relieved to be finished!

As I edited Part 3, I found the writing is more in line with my current style—which is represented at the end of the book—but I was again surprised by how much my writing style has changed so recently. Some of the editing was changes to the way things are presented, but it was predominantly simply rewriting complex sentences into smaller, stronger ones. As I read them out loud—to record them—and then listened, I had to admit I like it better this way. This encourages me to keep it up. I am still looking for that magic place where the book’s writing style is my writing style.

Part 3 is the second longest in the book. Its nine chapters remained after the edit and, although the number of scenes diminished by one, the number of pages increased from one-hundred-thirty to one-hundred-thirty-two. At the same time, I like it that my total word count dropped again, from 187,155 to 186,544.

It was fun going back through these chapters. It is the part of the book where the relationships between my characters start to really solidify. There are also several battles. I love battles. They go through a major failure where they loose two members of their little team—one to a death on the battlefield. Their grief rang true to me, so I hope that means it will speak to others.

Another thing I enjoyed was simply reading the story. I made a lot of changes when creating this draft—I already noted the word count more than doubled. A lot of that took place in this section, so some of the scenes actually surprised me, as a reader. I’ll be interested to see if this delights me again when I make my—hopefully—final pass through the book to ensure all the tenses are correct and the periods are in place at the end of sentences.

This is the part of the story where Coltan starts to feel more like a man. He begins to show a real interest in the well-being of the others in the group—especially Mar, at first—and then, he really falls in love with Gentu. He also has to come to terms with his limitations, in this respect—he is not a man. Criften is good at reminding him of this; Inla certainly does; he almost loses Gentu when the sun comes up. He even reminds himself during a dream where he basks in the sun.

Coltan’s relationship with the rest of the group starts to change by the end of Part 3. Even though he never challenges Gillan’s leadership, Coltan begins to make decisions for the others, and no one questions it. An example of this is when Gentu asks Coltan if they can fight together, and he immediately says, ‘yes,’ without passing it by Gillan first. Malcan readily agrees. This was pretty subtle, but it is an important stepping stone in both increasing his authority among the group, and also his movement toward becoming more human.

The only one whose authority Coltan doesn’t trump is Criften, to whom he is deferential. When Criften tells him he can’t go with Gentu, Coltan pleads with him, then basically pouts before simply accepting it. These two have a completely different relationship—Coltan is, after all, magically “bound” to Criften.

I am looking forward to getting through the next section, Part 4: Colmaria, where we learn a lot about Malcan, and also get some idea of how the monarchy works. It is also the shortest. Hopefully, I can get through it in a week.

Copyright ©2014-17 Ramona Ridgewell. All rights reserved.

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