Tishta the Crystal Orb: Part 4 Revised Draft Complete

This has been a week of distractions.

Smoke and soot filled the air—and our homes—in Seattle and the entire Pacific Northwest. We literally could not see the sun through the haze, or, if we could, it was a red ball, casting an eerie amber glow.

The smoke came from the wildfires blazing throughout the West—1300 of them at a time—predominantly, in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana. The soot—that fell like tiny snowflakes throughout the region—came from the Jolly Mountain fire near Mount Rainier, as well as the devastating Eagle Creek fire in Oregon’s Columbia Gorge.

I had trouble breathing, so I cloistered myself inside my house with all the windows closed—this is a big issue in Seattle, where only 15% of homes have central air-conditioning. At the beginning of August, when it was projected that we would have a week of record-breaking temperatures around 100° F, I bought a little room AC. It turned out that, with the pall from the wildfires, the temperatures stayed down around 90°. People were making the choice between unbearable heat and unbreathable air. For me, the AC unit made sleep possible—cooling the air and filtering it a little. It continued to do so through the nearly constant smoke we have endured in the Pacific Northwest in August and September, a result of several very dry years in a row that have led to increasing numbers of fires every summer.

Beyond the local weather, last weekend, Hurricane Harvey blasted through Texas, bringing unheard of amounts of rain. During the week, my attention has been on Hurricanes Irma, Jose and Katia. As a category 5 storm, Irma flattened some of the Leeward Islands, especially Barbuda, where 95% of the buildings lay in ruins. It will make landfall in the Florida Keys as a category 4 storm early tomorrow morning. Amazing. Fortunately, Jose seems to want to go north, after grazing the Leeward Islands as a category 3. At the same time, Katia entered Veracruz, Mexico, as a category 1 hurricane—not so much damage there although two people died—only a few days after an 8.1 earthquake struck southern Mexico off the coast of Chiapas, leaving 66 dead.

From my own experience with the smoke and from viewing video of the destructive forces of wind and water, earth and fire, I have new images to draw upon in future writings. You have to look on the bright side.

A final distraction—one that is more subtle, but much more personal—is that today marks the fifth anniversary of my husband’s death. Because of the quirkiness of Earth’s rotation, and its revolution around Sol, it fell on the same day of the week. He was an emergency relief volunteer—a logistician—with the local, national and international Red Cross/Red Crescent, and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). He was deployed to numerous hurricane disasters. Hurricane season—especially a powerful one like this year’s—always brings back memories of sudden deployments and worry over his safety. It’s strange how the mind pulls up these things—of its own accord—disrupting sleep and causing lack of focus. The month from August 20 (his birthday) to September 22 (our anniversary) has been rough for me over the past four years. I’m doing better this year, but it’s still there.

Through all these distractions, I finished the revised edit of “Part 4: Colmaria” in only three days. Gonna toot my own horn a little on that. There is only one more part to go—albeit, the longest one in “Tishta the Crystal Orb.”

As I suspected would happen, the further I get into Tishta on this edit, the less I am removing—it is converging with my current writing style. In part 4, the word count actually went up by one word, to 27,322. I was a little surprised by this, but then I remembered adding some clarifying bits here and there that would have offset the word trimming I did. The page count went up by one, but that is totally expected as I continue to split up paragraphs by discrete subject/action.

An edit I will need to review one more time is the use of “not,” instead of  negative contractions, in the narrator’s text—I still use contractions in dialog, well, except for Mar. I am not sure how I feel about this yet. It makes the text a bit more formal. I had been making this edit already on most contractions, but now include “don’t,” “can’t” and a few others that did not sound right before. My ear must be changing as my style changes. I won’t know for sure how I feel about these until I record them and listen to them—and I don’t plan to do that until I finish this edit and get a copy into my Beta Reader’s hands.

Something I have recently been pondering is how often to use analogies. There are some in my text, but I have not gone out of my way to add more. I sometimes think authors overuse these, making them seem forced or contrived. The only ones I have included just popped out while I was writing. One of my favorites, in the scene called “Gnarled Limbs,” is:

The gelding nibbled at the feed, its soft muzzle gently picking at the grain, like mittened fingers.

Now that I have looked for examples to include here, I found analogies scattered throughout the book. I will quit worrying about this. I am sure there are plenty, and fairly certain they are not overdone.

Every day, I become more confident that Tishta is nearly ready to publish. Hopefully, I will make it through “Part 5: Mondar” very quickly. Creating the ebooks will be a snap using Scrivener. I think I will have no trouble meeting my goal of having books in the hands of my Beta Readers by the end of September. If you are interested in being part of this, let me know and I will add you to the list. Contact: TheWolfDreamBooks@gmail.com.

Copyright ©2014-17 Ramona Ridgewell. All rights reserved.

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