Tishta the Crystal Orb: Another Quick Edit

In my research, I found an answer to something that has been nagging me. In the very first draft of “Tishta the Crystal Orb,” I put a line with a centered tilde between short scenes within scenes. By the time I finished the last major edit of the second draft, I had removed all of these. At times, I thought the leaps between the sub-scenes were too jarring, so would likely confuse my readers.

A few days ago, I found some words about switching between the points of view of different characters within a scene. The strong recommendation was to avoid it, pretty much, at all costs. This was food for thought. There are so many characters in Tishta that it is difficult to avoid doing it. The second bit of advice was, if you must change POV, put a blank line between the sub-scenes. As with all writing advice, once I understood why the advice was given, I could see lots of the “bad” writing behavior in my own words. I sighed and dove into the book, yet again.

What I discovered was enlightening to me. A lot of the places I was already uncomfortable with were exactly those place where I was changing POV—or the timeframe or location. With “permission” from the blogs and posts I had read, I added line feeds between the sub-scenes. What a relief.

A secondary benefit was realized. Just like when I broke up my paragraphs to make them contain single character/actions, I edited the transitions to make them cleaner. Things read more easily now.

As I went through the scenes, I took notice of places where I was “in the character’s head.” I removed a lot of these, trying to ensure the scene or sub-scene was from the POV of a single character. I decided many of them were extraneous. With others, I changed the line or lines to “show” the same thing without simply having the character thinking about it—which is really telling, not showing.

A nice thing is, the word count, again, went down—this time by 150 words—although the page count went up, with all those additional empty lines.

While I’d really like to get this draft of the book into my Beta Reader’s hands, I found something else out today, as I was preparing for open mic at Two Hour Transport tonight. (Two Hour Transport happens each month on the fourth Wednesday at Cafe Racer. Host Theresa J Barker keeps the atmosphere warm and nurturing—a great place to practice reading to an audience, to share your stories, and to get to know other writers in the Seattle SciFi and Fantasy community.) I mentioned in prior posts that I have not recorded the scenes after this last major edit. I recorded a couple of scenes that I might read tonight—to make sure they would fit into five minutes or less; to practice; and so I could listen to them. After speaking, and then hearing, the words out loud, I made several changes to both of the scenes. It makes me uncomfortable releasing the book without first recording and listening to it. I will be debating with myself over the next several days about this.

Right now, I am inclined to just send it out. The sooner I get some feedback, the better. It does not need to be perfect at this point. I have about two dozen people on my list. I have collected a list of focus points and questions for my readers. I need to compose a letter; figure out what format to create the book in; maybe create a Facebook group. I feel very close.

If you have ever sent your book out to Beta Readers, what advice do you have for a fledging author?

Copyright ©2014-17 Ramona Ridgewell. All rights reserved.

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